Tangible Personal Property Taxes are an ad valorem tax assessed against furniture, fixtures and equipment located in businesses and rental property. It also applies to structural additions to mobiles homes.

The Property Appraiser’s Office assesses the value of Tangible Personal Property and presents a certified tax roll to the Tax Collector. It is the responsibility of the Tax Collector to mail the tax notices and collect the taxes due.

Tax bills for Tangible Personal Property are mailed at the same time as the Real Estate Tax bills and the same discounts apply.

Paying Your Tangible Personal Property Taxes

There are three ways to pay your taxes — in-person, by mail or online.

Tangible Personal Property Taxes are mailed to property owners by November 1 of each year. The full amount of taxes owed is due by March 31. The following early payment discounts are available to Orange County taxpayers:

  • 4% discount if paid in November
  • 3% discount if paid in December
  • 2% discount if paid in January
  • 1% discount if paid in February

Pay Your Taxes >

Orange County Tax Collector

Delinquent Tangible Personal Property Taxes

Tangible Personal Property Taxes become delinquent April 1, at which time a 1.5% interest charge and advertising costs are added to the gross amount of the tax.

Pursuant to Florida Statutes, tax warrants are issued prior to April 30 of the following year on all unpaid Tangible Personal Property Taxes . Within 30 days after tax warrants are prepared, the Tax Collector applies to the Circuit Court for an order directing levy and seizure of the property for the amount of unpaid taxes and costs.

Bought or Sold Tangible Personal Property

The Tangible Personal Property Tax Bill is issued to the owner who appears on the certified tax roll provided by the Orange County Property Appraiser. This owner is responsible for the tax bill for that year. Any proration of tangible taxes must be determined between the buyer and seller and handled at the closing of the sale.

Even though the warrant is issued in the owner’s name as provided by the Property Appraiser, it is important to note that the tax lien attaches to the tangible personal property. If the tangible taxes remain unpaid, this lien survives the sale or transfer of the tangible personal property.